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Salivary Glands (Advanced)

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Parotid Glands:
1. Largest salivary glands.
2. Anterior and inferior to the ears.
3. Encased in connective tissue between the skin and the masseter muscle.
4. Parotid ducts pierce the buccinator muscle and open into the vestibule of the mouth near the 2nd molar of the upper jaw. This is Stenson’s Duct.
5. Stimulated by acid substances in the mouth.
6. The amylase enzyme it secretes splits starch molecules.

Submandibular Glands:
1. Lie bilaterally along the medial aspect of the mandibular angle of the jaw.
2. The submandibular ducts open at the base of the lingual frenulum. This is Wharton’s duct.
3. Its secretions help hold the food together in a bolus for swallowing.

Sublingual Gland:
1. Lies anterior to the submandibular gland under the tongue.
2. Has many sublingual ducts that open into the floor of the mouth called the Ducts of Rivinus.

Salivary Glands

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